Best Budget Gravel Bikes of 2024: Top Models Under $2,000

Best Budget Gravel Bikes of 2024: Your Gateway to Affordable Gravel Adventures

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A carefully curated best budget gravel bike selection for novice riders to get a taste of off-road adventuring without breaking the bank.

Gravel biking has surged in popularity in recent years thanks to its appeal of adventuring off the beaten path and away from busy roads, drawing cyclists to scenic routes and challenging terrain.

If you’re new to the sport, the cost of entry can seem prohibitive. But, fortunately, the market now offers a selection of budget gravel bikes, designed with the beginner rider in mind.

While these bikes introduce some compromises and lack some advanced features of their high-end carbon counterparts, they are an excellent starting point for giving gravel adventures a try.

In this article, we will explore the best budget gravel bikes on the market right now, as well as explain what key features novice riders should prioritize to maximize their off-road experience.

For pricier and more advanced options, we recommend reading our buying guide on the best gravel bikes.

Best Budget Gravel Bike Lineup


1. Co-op Cycles ADV 2.2
2. Cannondale Topstone 4
3. Specialized Diverge E5
4. Trek Checkpoint ALR 4
5. Diamondback Haanjo 2
6. Salsa Journeyer Claris 650B
7. GT Grade Sport
8. Liv Avail AR 4
9. Giant Revolt 2
10. Felt Broam 60
11. State Bicycle Co. 6061 All-Road
12. Tommaso Sentiero


 

1. Co-op Cycles ADV 2.2

Best Value Option

Co-op Cycles ADV 2.2 budget gravel bike

  • MSRP: $1,599
  • Frame: Aluminum
  • Gears: Shimano GRX400 2×10
  • Brakes: Mechanical disc brakes
  • Tires: 700c x 40mm (clearance up to 44mm)

 

Gravel biking does not need to be prohibitively expensive. A budget gravel bike like the Co-op Cycles ADV 2.2 will give you a proper taste of gravel at a relatively low price point.

This bike comes with a double-butted aluminum frame and carbon fork, which is pretty much the combination you can expect in this price range. The 23.5 lb weight is not featherlight, but it is far from heavy for a sub $2,000 gravel bike.

The reason why we labeled the ADV 2.2 as the best value option is the gravel-specific 2×10 Shimano GRX groupset coupled with Tektro’s mechanical disc brakes. Sure, both are suitable for entry-level riders, but they won’t leave any beginner feeling like they’re missing out.

Related: Review of Co-op Cycles ADV 2.1

However, if you want more gears and hydraulic disc brakes, we recommend the higher-priced Co-op Cycles ADV 2.3. But you’ll have to pay almost $1,000 more for it.

We also love the rowdy WTB Silverado Comp 700c x 40mm tires with a knobby profile that feels grippy on chunky climbs.

Consider reading more about the Co-op Cycles ADV series in our detailed review.

Buy from REI.com


2. Cannondale Topstone 4

Best for a Mix of On- and Off-Roading

Cannondale Topstone 4 cheap gravel bike

  • MSRP: $1,175
  • Frame: Aluminum
  • Gears: microShift Advent X 1×10
  • Brakes: Mechanical disc brakes
  • Tires: 700c x 37mm (clearance for 40mm+)

 

The Cannondale Topstone 4 gives you a premium look, multiple mounts on the frame and fork, and tan-wall tires at an unbelievable price.

We love the fact you can easily outfit it with front and rear racks, a top tube bag for snacks, and additional frame bags and head out on a multi-day adventure.

Depending on where you intend to go, the 700c x 37mm WTB Riddler Comp tires could be limiting, but you can up the width to 40mm and possibly more. Unfortunately, the rims are not tubeless-ready, but the tires are.

Read more: Overview of Cannondale Topstone Series

The Topstone 4 also comes with an off-road-ready microShift Advent X rear derailleur with a clutch, coupled with an 11-48T cassette and a 40T chainring. That translates to plenty of low gears for climbing.

The weakest link, in our opinion, is the Promax mechanical disc brakes, which is the first thing we’d upgrade.

If you can spare to spend more, we recommend also checking out the Cannondale Topstone 1, featuring hydraulic disc brakes and a better groupset.

Buy from REI.com    Buy from MikesBikes.com


3. Specialized Diverge E5

Best Tire Clearance

Specialized Diverge E5 affordable gravel bike

  • MSRP: $1,300
  • Frame: Aluminum
  • Gears: Shimano Claris 2×8
  • Brakes: Mechanical disc brakes
  • Tires: 700c x 38mm (up to 700x47mm or 650×2.1″)

 

Whether you’re looking for the best budget gravel bike to escape the busy paved roads, explore off-road routes, or make your road rides more comfortable, the Specialized Diverge E5 could meet your expectations.

The combination of Specialized’s E5 alloy frame and premium FACT carbon fork brings the weight down to below 23 lb, which is great considering the heavy(ish) components. You’ll love the frame and fork mounts, allowing you to retrofit accessories and frame bags with ease.

The Diverge E5 is compatible with 700c or 650b wheels and 47mm or 2.1″ tires, respectively. This gives you the freedom to choose between a more efficient or more rowdy performance.

Related: Review of Specialized Bikes

We’re not big fans of the Shimano Claris groupset, but we should keep in mind this bike’s intended audience. In that context, the 2×8 drivetrain and cable-actuated brakes are quite fitting.

Finally, the Diverge E5 has a long and progressive geometry for a drop-bar gravel bike, resulting in a planted feeling while off-road riding.

We recommend checking out the rest of the Specialized Diverge series as well, especially if you’re looking for a slightly higher build quality.

Buy from Specialized.com


4. Trek Checkpoint ALR 4

Best for Bikepacking Trips

Trek Checkpoint ALR 4 best budget gravel bike

  • MSRP: $1,800
  • Frame: Aluminum
  • Gears: SRAM Apex 1×11
  • Brakes: Mechanical disc brakes
  • Tires: 700c x 40mm (up to 700x45mm or 27.5×2.1″)

 

The Trek Checkpoint ALR 4 is one of the best budget gravel bikes on this list, but it comes with a slightly higher price compared to the other options we’ve listed.

The good news is that you get your money’s worth back reflected in the low weight, decent components, and tons of mounts.

Firstly, the SRAM Apex 1 drivetrain delivers 11 gears with a 1x chainset, though the 11-42T cassette and 40T chainring might leave you lacking granny gears on super steep climbs.

Related: Trek Bikes Brand Review

Considering the steep price for a budget gravel build, we believe the Checkpoint ALR 4 should have come with hydraulic disc brakes. However, the Tektro dual-piston mechanical ones work pretty well. If you’re looking for a build with hydraulic disc brakes, consider the Trek Checkpoint ALR 5.

We’re most excited about the tubeless-ready Bontrager rims and tires (clearance for 700x45mm or 27.5×2.1″), which is a big plus on any affordable gravel bike.

Unfortunately, punctures are an unavoidable part of off-roading when you’re running tubes, so run tubeless tires if you have the chance.

Buy from TrekBikes.com


5. Diamondback Haanjo 2

Best for Mixed-Surface Riders

Diamondback Haanjo 2

  • MSRP: $1,000
  • Frame: Aluminum
  • Gears: Shimano Claris 2×8
  • Brakes: Mechanical disc brakes
  • Tires: 700c x 37mm

 

The Diamondback Haanjo 2 is one of the most affordable gravel bikes on this list, so it’s perfect if you’re switching from a flat-bar mountain bike to your first drop-bar bike and you don’t know if you’ll like it.

The Haanjo 2 makes some slight compromises to keep the price around the $1K mark, but it won’t hinder your desire to steer off the beaten path and have the most amount of fun possible.

In terms of components, it has the standard trifecta of cheap gravel bikes—Shimano Claris groupset, mechanical disc brakes, and WTB Riddler Comp 700c x 37mm tires. There’s nothing too flashy about them, but no reason to bash them either, considering the Haanjo 2’s intended rider.

Read more:
Diamondback Haanjo Series Overview
Diamondback Haanjo 3 Review

This bike has a relatively upright geometry, so it doubles as a comfy commuter in addition to being a capable gravel explorer.

All in all, we like the overall package (especially the sleek looks with tan-wall tires and deep blue color scheme), though we think there is some room for improvement.

Buy from REI.com    Buy from Diamondback.com


6. Salsa Journeyer Claris 650b

Best 650b Budget Gravel Bike

Salsa Journeyer Claris 650B

  • MSRP: $999
  • Frame: Aluminum
  • Gears: Shimano Claris 2×8
  • Brakes: Mechanical disc brakes
  • Tires: 650b x 47mm

 

The Salsa Journeyer is another cheap gravel bike with great looks and a well-balanced spec list.

If you’re looking to explore chunkier gravel and pedal off-road most of the time, you’ll appreciate the rowdy 650b x 47mm tires as much as we did. However, it’s good to know that the Salsa Journeyer Series is also compatible with 700c wheels and tires, so you can swap between the two when your priorities change.

Salsa Cycles is best known for building adventure bikes, and the Journeyer is no exception. It’s your entry ticket into multi-day adventure riding, with a frame and fork that let you install various accessories, including racks, fenders, bottle cages, and frame bags.

The Shimano Claris 2×8 drivetrain and Tektro flat-mount mechanical disc brakes might not ‘wow’ you, but they’ll provide you with crisp shifting and reliable braking in most conditions.

Most of us ride gravel bikes to be able to set off from our doorstep and link exciting off-road sections while riding smooth pavement in between—that’s exactly what the Salsa Journeyer is made for.

Buy from REI.com


7. GT Grade Sport

Best Vibration Dampening

gt grade sport gravel bike

  • MSRP: $1,500
  • Frame: Aluminum
  • Gears: microShift Advent X 10-speed
  • Brakes: Mechanical disc brakes
  • Tires: 700c x 37mm

 

While there are cheaper options on this list with similar components, you’d be hard-pressed to get a budget gravel bike that feels as plush and looks as luxurious as the GT Grade Sport.

Namely, this gravel grinder boasts a full carbon fork and an aluminum frame with a triple triangle design that provides advanced vibration absorption equal to 30mm of suspension travel (according to GT Bikes).

If you want to get rowdy and explore the forgotten and unkempt gravel roads in your area, the frameset will definitely allow it. However, you might want to consider going for wider tires, as the stock 37mm WTB Riddler tires might feel a bit skinny.

The microShift Advent X rear derailleur offers 10 speeds and comes with a clutch to prevent chain slaps and dropped chains. The Promax mechanical disc brakes are slightly underwhelming considering the higher price, but that’s the reality of modern bike pricing.

A big plus for this bike is the fact that both the WTB tires and the rims are tubeless-ready, so you can easily convert and save yourself from pesky punctures.

Make sure to also read our review of the GT Grade Carbon Elite if you’re interested in a more capable build of this bike.

Buy from JensonUSA.com


8. Liv Devote 2 Be Good Edition

Best Budget Gravel Bike for Women

LIV Devote 2 Be Good women's budget gravel bike

  • MSRP: $1,350
  • Frame: Aluminum
  • Gears: Shimano Sora 2×9
  • Brakes: Mechanical disc brakes
  • Tires: 700c x 38mm (clearance for 45mm)

 

The Liv Devote 2 is an aluminum gravel bike built with a frame geometry that favors off-road capability more than on-road speed.

It features a long wheelbase, slack front end, and tire clearance up to 45mm, so it’s obvious that the Devote 2 excels once the tarmac ends.

On top of that, the women-specific design is optimized for the women’s body, and the D-Fuse handlebar and seatpost decrease road vibrations, mimicking suspension.

The durable ALUXX-Grade aluminum frame is decently lightweight and the Advanced-Grade Composite fork helps in dampening vibrations further.

However, the Devote 2 leans more toward the hardpacked fast gravel routes than rough technical climbs. It has a Shimano Sora 2×9 drivetrain with an 11-34T cassette and a 32/48mm crankset, so proper ‘grannies’ might lack a granny gear or two.

The Be Good edition bikes have been designed by Liv Cycles with the help of adventure athlete Rebecca Rusch, supporting her Be Good Foundation.

If you’re looking for a more capable build, we recommend considering the Liv Devote Advanced 2 with a carbon frame and a high-end build.

Buy from MikesBikes.com


9. Giant Revolt 2

Best All-Rounder Gravel Bike

giant revolt 2

  • MSRP: $1,350
  • Frame: Aluminum
  • Gears: Shimano Sora 2×9
  • Brakes: Mechanical Disc Brakes
  • Tires: 700c x 38mm

 

The Giant Revolt 2 could best be described as a versatile all-rounder that lets you ride smooth paved roads and then keep the same speed and momentum once the gravel grinding begins.

The Revolt 2 has a surprise that’s rarely seen in this price range—a flip-chip on the rear dropout that lets you change the geometry and adjust the wheelbase and tire clearance. The D-Fuse seatpost adds compliance to the ride, but you can switch to a 30.9mm round or dropper post for rougher riding.

Related: Review of Giant Bikes

This budget gravel bike comes with 700c x 38mm tires, but with the long setting on the flip-chip, there’s enough clearance for up to 53mm wide rubber.

The rest of the build is not shabby either, including a Shimano Sora 2×9 groupset and mechanical disc brakes with 160mm rotors. However, considering the gravel routes we ride involve a lot of climbing, we’d probably upgrade the stock 11-34T cassette and the 32/48 chainrings for something with a wider range.

If your budget is more lenient, we recommend also checking out the Giant Revolt Advanced 3, featuring a much more capable carbon build.

Buy from MikesBikes.com


10. Felt Broam 60

Best Endurance Geometry

Felt Broam 60

  • MSRP: $1,299
  • Frame: Aluminum
  • Gears: Shimano Claris/Sora 2×8
  • Brakes: Mechanical disc brakes
  • Tires: 700c x 40mm

 

The Felt Broam 60 is a capable, fun, and comfortable aluminum gravel bike, even if you spend hours in the saddle riding away from civilization.

It has dual-wheel compatibility, allowing you to ride with 700c or 650b wheels and tires, as well as mounts for racks, fenders, and frame bags. Therefore, you can go bikepacking, gravel grinding for fitness, or even commute on workdays.

Like many other affordable gravel bikes on this list, the Broam 60 sports a Shimano Claris/Sora groupset with a total of 16 gears, paired with mechanical disc brakes.

The stock 40mm tires will support and nurture your sense of adventure, though you can certainly go even wider than that.

Maintenance is also easy thanks to barrel adjusters on the hoses, and the threaded bottom bracket is known to be durable and creak-free.

Finally, the Felt Broam 60 has one of the best-optimized endurance geometries on this list, so choose it if you plan to ride long distances.

Buy from PlanetCyclery.com


11. State Bicycle Co. 6061 All-Road

State Bicycle Co. 6061 All-Road

  • MSRP: $1,400
  • Frame: Aluminum
  • Gears: State’s All-Road 1×11 drivetrain
  • Brakes: Cable-actuated hydraulic brakes
  • Tires: 700c x 38mm or 650b x 47mm

 

The State Bicycle Co. 6061 All-Road bike might be our favorite when it comes to affordable gravel bikes as it gives you the freedom to customize it any way you want before buying.

The bike is built around an aluminum frame and carbon fork with multiple mounts, compatible with both 700c and 650b wheels. In fact, State lets you choose between the two sizes, or you can choose both for a $350 surcharge and receive another pair of wheels, tubes, tires, cassette, and rotors. That would mean you get two bikes for almost the price of one.

Related: Review of State Bicycle Co.

The stock model comes with State’s proprietary 1×11 drivetrain and cable-actuated hydraulic disc brakes, but you can upgrade these specs as well if you have money to spare. The derailleur has a clutch, so you won’t get chain-slap while going over bumpy terrain.

Where does the 6061 All-Road bike feel at home? Pretty much anywhere, doing anything, with the right pair of tires. You can use it for multi-day bikepacking on maintained singletrack trails, entry gravel racing, or day-to-day off-road exploring.

Buy from StateBicycle.com


12. Tommaso Sentiero

Tommaso Sentiero cheap gravel bike

  • MSRP: $950
  • Frame: Aluminum
  • Gears: Shimano Claris 3×8
  • Brakes: Mechanical disc brakes
  • Tires: 700c x 40mm

 

Tommaso Sentiero is the lowest-priced budget gravel bike you can get on the market, with a price tag well under $1,000. We recommend it to beginners and recreational riders who want to see what the gravel craze is all about.

The Sentiero is a bit of an outlier, featuring a 3×8 Shimano Claris drivetrain (most manufacturers use 1x or 2x cranksets) and no internal cable routing. The appearance is definitely not as sleek as it could be with internally routed cables, but the matte black paint job looks great.

Related: Review of Tommaso Bikes

This bike is built around a lightweight aluminum frame and a steel fork, which is an unusual combination, but the benefits of steel are well-known for off-road riding—improved compliance and more comfort.

The 700c x 40mm tires are wide enough to allow you to explore most roads and maintained trails in your area, while the Avid BB5 mechanical disc brakes will stop you on a dime.

If you don’t mind making some aesthetic compromises to pay less for your entry ticket to gravel riding, we recommend getting the Tommaso Sentiero.

Buy from TommasoCycling.com    Buy on Amazon.com

 

How to Choose the Best Budget Gravel Bike


black specialized gravel bike

Choosing the best budget gravel bike can be tricky, especially for beginners who are still not familiar with all the ins and outs of cycling.

The process involves balancing cost with important features to ensure you end up with a bike that’s durable and performs well on mixed terrain.

The guide below will explain the key factors to consider when choosing an affordable gravel bike, such as frame materials, components, tire size, weight, and more.

 

Frame Materials: Aluminum or Steel?

rear view of a black cannondale aluminum gravel bike
Aluminum and steel are the go-to frame materials for best budget gravel bikes as carbon typically becomes available at a higher price point.

When it comes to buying the best budget gravel bike you can for your money, aluminum and steel are the only two frame materials you should consider.

Most gravel bikes under $2,000 that we’ve listed above come with an aluminum frame and a carbon fiber fork, though steel is sometimes an option as well.

These provide a good balance between weight, strength, and price, which leaves more wiggle room to get good components on your bike.

Aluminum and steel frames offer the best balance of weight, strength, and affordability in budget gravel bikes, with carbon best left for higher budgets.

Carbon fiber becomes an option once you pass the $2,000 or $2,500 price point, but even then there could be some compromises in terms of the groupset and other bike parts that you get with the frame.

If you do find a carbon fiber budget gravel bike below $2,000, it will most likely be made with low-quality carbon and equipped with low-tier components to bring the manufacturing costs down.

Must-Have Components

a closeup of a drivetrain on a budget gravel bike drivetrain
The top features to prioritize on your next budget gravel bike include a high-quality frame, reliable groupset, disc brakes, and tubeless-ready rims and tires.

Unfortunately, buying a cheap gravel bike means that you’ll have to make some compromises. Therefore, you’ll have to think about your spec list priorities and try to find a model that incorporates most of them.

In our opinion, the four main components you should prioritize include:

  • A lightweight aluminum frame
  • A reliable drivetrain
  • Quality disc brakes
  • Tubeless-ready rims and tires

 

As mentioned above, aluminum is the most common frame material you’ll encounter in the budget gravel category. Getting a high-quality lightweight aluminum frame with lower-end components will feel better to ride than a low-quality frame with better components. Therefore, this should be your top priority. Luckily, most reputable bike brands don’t cut any corners in this area.

Next, a reliable drivetrain manufactured by Shimano, SRAM, or microShift is preferable. Most entry-level gravel bikes come with microShift Advent X or Shimano Claris/Sora groupsets, all of which are reliable choices that work well. They may not offer the most gears or the crispiest shifting, but they’ll last a long time with proper care.

Disc brakes are another non-negotiable component. Preferably, you’d want to get dual-piston hydraulic disc brakes, but this is hard to find on the best budget gravel bikes. Your second best option is a high-quality set of dual-piston mechanical disc brakes that offer less modulation and control but more than enough braking power to stop you reliably.

Finally, punctures are very common in gravel riding if you’re using clincher tires with inner tubes. To avoid this, you should look for a bike with tubeless-ready rims and tires that are suitable for tubeless conversion.

Wheel and Tire Size: 650B or 700C?

front wheel of a budget gravel bike
Choose 700c wheels and tires if you plan to do mixed-surface riding, or choose 650b wheels and tires if you intend to mostly do off-roading.

You’ll see that modern gravel bikes come with 700c or 650b wheels and tires, while some models can accommodate both sizes. But which ones should you choose?

If you plan to ride a mix of paved and unpaved roads, it’s best to choose the lower-weight 700c wheel size. They not only weigh less than 650b wheels but also have a lower rolling resistance, better rollover, a can reach and maintain high speeds more easily.

For versatility in gravel biking, choose 700c wheels for mixed road use and 650b for rough terrain, or select a bike that accommodates both for the best of both worlds.

On the other hand, if you plan to mostly ride off-road on rougher terrain, 650b wheels and tires will serve you well. The smaller diameter of the rim means that you can use wider tires, which will give you better off-roading capabilities, more stability, and allow you to run lower tire pressure.

The best option is to get a model that’s compatible with both sizes and switch between them depending on what kind of ride you’re planning to do on a particular day.

Weight

Should you be worried about the weight of your budget gravel bike? As far as we’re concerned, no, you shouldn’t.

There’s no escaping the fact that cheaper bikes weigh more than pricier bikes—they use heavier materials, lower-tier components that weigh more, and heavier wheels.

Most bikes in this price range weigh around 22-23 lb (~10 kg), which is not lightweight, but not critically heavy either.

Even though weight is a hot topic in cycling these days, we think you should not obsess with the power-to-weight ratio at this level.

For beginner cyclists who ride for fitness or recreation, weight does not matter that much because a 2.2 lb (1 kg) increase in weight typically results in a one to two-minute slower time over a 60-mile (100 km) hilly ride. Unless you’re racing, it’s not likely this will make a big difference in your ride experience.

Is a Budget Gravel Bike Slow on the Road?

a rear view of an affordable gravel bike being ridden on a road
Budget gravel bikes are only slightly slower on paved roads compared to road bikes. If you use road tires on your gravel bike, the difference in speed will be negligible.

The preconception that gravel bikes are slow on the road is generally not correct, especially when it comes to modern gravel bikes. We talk more about this in our Gravel vs. Road Bikes guide.

Multiple real-world tests have been done that show gravel bikes are only a couple of miles per hour slower than road bikes on the road, which is negligible relative to the comfort and off-road versatility you get in turn.

Modern gravel bikes, only slightly slower than road bikes on pavement, offer a negligible speed difference in exchange for greater comfort and off-road versatility.

A budget gravel bike can definitely feel nippy to ride on smooth tarmac, especially if you inflate the tires up a bit more and ride in the drops to improve the aerodynamics.

One thing to keep in mind is that 700c wheels and tires will perform better on paved roads, so consider these over the 650b counterpart if you intend to go on mixed-terrain rides.

Best Upgrades for a Budget Gravel Bike

closeup of hydraulic disc brakes on a gravel bike
Installing high-quality hydraulic disc brakes on your budget gravel bike is one of the best upgrades you can make, in addition to changing the wheelset and groupset.

Is a cheap gravel bike worth upgrading?

In our opinion, assuming your bike has a high-quality aluminum frame with a lightweight carbon fork, you should definitely consider upgrading some components to make it lighter, faster, and more capable.

Better Wheels and Tires (Tubeless)

The easiest and fastest upgrade you can make (but not the cheapest) is to buy a better wheelset and switch to a tubeless tire setup. This will lower the weight of your bike, decrease rolling resistance (better speed, acceleration, and climbing), and prevent punctures. This can make a huge difference in your overall ride quality, so it’s something worth considering.

Hydraulic Disc Brakes

The next upgrade we’d consider that’s not as expensive, but a bit more complicated to achieve, is to install better brakes. Most of the best budget gravel bikes come with mechanical disc brakes, so switching to hydraulic disc brakes could make the world of difference. However, keep in mind that this warrants changing the brake calipers, hoses, and levers, so you’ll likely need to pay someone skilled to do it.

Groupset

Finally, changing your groupset can be expensive and tricky, but could be worth it if you’re happy with the quality of your bike’s frame. This includes swapping the derailleur(s), cassette, crankset, levers and cables. This involves a lot of work and additional costs, so it’s the last upgrade we’d recommend.

Additional Gravel Riding Costs to Consider

closeup of gravel bike shoes
Cycling can be expensive initially, as you need to purchase some essential safety gear in addition to the bike.

If you’re completely new to cycling, buying your first gravel bike won’t be the only cost you would need to consider. If you want to do it safely and enjoy the journey, you’ll need to account for a few additional pieces of gear.

Therefore, when planning your budget, keep these costs in mind as well:

  • Helmet: A high-quality bike helmet is a must when it comes to any kind of cycling, especially gravel. Falls are not uncommon when riding off-road and a helmet will help protect your head and prevent brain injuries.
  • Pedals: Most new bikes don’t include pedals, so this is another additional cost you’ll have to consider. We recommend getting a pair of clipless best bike pedals right away if you’re serious about cycling because you’ll definitely want to make the change from flat pedals at one point in the future.
  • Shoes: If you choose to go the clipless route, you’ll also need to invest in a pair of clipless-compatible cycling shoes. Otherwise, if you ride with flat pedals, you can use any sports shoes or buy flat mountain bike shoes.
  • Gloves: Cycling gloves are an important piece of gear for safety and comfort reasons. Most models have padding that will protect your palms in the event of a fall and also alleviate some pressure from your wrists while riding.
  • Glasses: Some riders prefer riding without glasses, but the majority use them. They’ll keep bugs and dust out of your eyes and help you see better on bright sunny days. Cycling specific sunglasses are preferable, but any old pair will work.
  • Clothing: Finally, investing in cycling-specific clothing is a good idea, as it will make your rides more comfortable. A pair of high-quality bib shorts with padding will prevent saddle sores, whereas cycling jerseys are made from moisture-wicking materials and have handy pockets to carry nutrition and spares.

 

If you’re completely new to cycling and buying all of this gear from scratch, consider you’ll have to spend another $200-250 on top of the price of the bike. You’d also want to get a few tools and spares to keep your bike in working order, such as a multi-tool, tire patching kit, and spare tubes.

But, once you get over the initial costs, you’ll be all set to enjoy your new budget gravel bike and start adventuring and exploring off the beaten path!

Best Gravel Bikes You Can Get

 

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